Weekly Snapshots Issue 66 – 28 February 2020

Case we’re reviewing…

On 11 February 2020, the High Court released its findings in the case of Love v Commonwealth of Australia and Thoms v Commonwealth of Australia. The Plaintiffs, Love & Thoms were born outside of Australia and did not acquire Australian Citizenships. Ordinarily this would classify them as aliens within section 51(xix) of the Australian Constitution.

The Plaintiffs were born in Papua New Guinea and New Zealand but lived in Australia for long periods of time as holders of a visa. Each Plaintiff had a parent who was an Australian Citizen but neither plaintiff had applied for citizenship throughout their lengthy residence in Australia. The visas were cancelled when the plaintiffs became convicted of an offence which carried a 12 month sentence of imprisonment. Ordinarily in such circumstances, they must leave the country. The Plaintiffs however argued that they in fact fall outside the purview of the Migration Act and Citizenship Act because they have a special status as non citizen; non-alien. Both Plaintiffs identify and have been recognised as being Aboriginal people; belonging to the Gungarri and Kamilaroi people respectively. Under the Citizenship Act, a person is automatically a citizen if born in Australia or born to one or more parents who are Australian Citizens or permanent residents of Australia at the time. Citizenship by descent is not automatic however and precedent case law has established that a mere connection and long residence in Australia is not enough to deem a person non-alien.

Despite this, the four judges in the majority found that Aboriginal people cannot be deemed to be aliens; albeit having reached their conclusions by different reasoning.

The case really divided the High Court (three Judges had dissented) but essentially found that Aboriginal peoples cultural and spiritual connection to the land and waters meant they belonged to Australia and therefore could not be classed as aliens. Because they belonged to Australia, the Crown had an obligation to protect Aboriginal people and in return they owned Judges in dissent however pointed out that the definition of belonging to land and water was different to the meaning of belonging in a constitutional context.

Music we’re trialling…

There’s no denying the impact of music on mood and creating an atmosphere and of course we all have our favourite genres and preferences. UK Bank Marconi Union collaborated with sound therapist to create a soundtrack Weightless that has been proven to result in a 65% reduction in the listener’s anxiety, heart rate, blood pressure and lower the levels of cortisone, the stress hormone. Try it today for instant “I’m at a luxurious spa on an ocean cliff” vibes

  Advice we’re following…

If you keep thinking, acting and feeling the same way, your life is going to stay exactly the same In order for you to create a new personal reality, you have to dissociate from your present personality. Get beyond the way you always think. Get beyond the automatic habits and behaviour to transcend the emotions that keep you connected to the familiar past and the predictable future Joe Dispenza.

Ted talk we’ve loved…

Neuroscientist Sandrine Thuret gives a fascinating TED talk on neurogenesis; that is growing new nerve cells in the hippocampus as adults (previously thought to be impossible!). Why bother generating new neurons? Because these suckers are very important for learning and memory. When blocked; our spatial recognition (how we navigate ourselves) and quality of memory is greatly impaired. Interestingly neuroscientists have found a strong link between neurogenesis and deterring depression or at least increasing the efficacy of antidepressants when we’re participating in activities that boost neurogenesis.  

So what boosts neurogenesis? Learning & Sex are the two activities hailed by Thuret, mind you she does warn jokingly not to get carried away with the sex to the point it leads to sleep deprivation which, along with stress impedes neurogenesis.

What you eat and how much you move also plays a big role. Calorie restriction (20-30%) Intermittent fasting & Omega 3 Fatty Acids will boost neurogenesis while conversely a diet rich in high saturated fat and alcohol will decrease it.

Interestingly Japanese study groups have found that the texture of what you eat will also either boost or impede neurogenesis apparently a diet of soft foods is not as productive as a diet of varied textured foods especially including crunchy & chewy foods.

Masters of Success…